Nurse's Job Comes First

Jaafer Beydoun RN 2

When a patient’s health is on the line, it’s important to know that the care team will be there … no matter what. While this is a common practice at Henry Ford Health System, sometimes this availability deserves mentioning.

Pharmacy Resident Olga Yankulina noted the exceptional readiness, accountability and care provided by Jaafer Beydoun, RN recently at Henry Ford Hospital. Beydoun was unable to draw back on the PICC line and verified with the physician that it would be appropriate to delay administration of antibiotics until he was able to collect the vancomycin trough, in order to evaluate the remaining level of medications in the patient’s system.

Yankulina, who was working with this patient, contacted Beydoun regarding this decision. She contacted him on his mobile phone while he was on his lunch break. Beydoun took the time to fully explain the situation to the extent where Yankulina could create and communicate an alternative antibiotic plan. She later contacted Beydoun again on his mobile — during his lunch break — to learn the status of the PICC line and trough.

“He once again picked up the phone on his lunch break,” Yankulina explained. “He was able to successfully draw a trough when he returned and the patient was able to receive her medication. He was also able to provide me with other pertinent information so that I could more accurately assess the patient.”

Jaafer sees nothing notable in his care of this patient, but acknowledges that the care of the patient is always primary, no matter what.

“Even though I was on a lunch break, it does not take too long to go out of the way to help a patient with this particular intervention,” he said. “It is common practice for me to carry my phone during a lunch break so that I can continue doing what is best for my patients.”

While this does not happen every day, Beydoun recognizes that skipping a break can lead to mental or even physical fatigue. He credits his fitness routine in helping him to maintain his energy level.

“I believe it is my active lifestyle that keeps me going,” he said. “Weight lifting and exercising are a big part of my daily routine. From this, I am able to maintain a high energy level throughout the day.

“I also take breaks. You definitely need them during a long shift. Nobody should ever deprive themselves from a break. If you feel hungry and all caught up with your work, take a five-minute breather and get yourself a snack. Just make sure that your patients are safe and in good hands.”