Assistive Listenting Devices

Hearing Assistive Technology (HAT) or assistive listening devices (ALD) are any type of technology that helps in various listening situations. These technologies are designed to enhance telephone communication, TV reception, efficacy of safety devices (such as smoke alarms) or to enhance listening in various situations. HAT devices can expand the functionality of hearing aids and cochlear implants.

A few examples include:

  • Amplified telephones provide additional volume compared to typical telephones.
  • Captioned telephones work like any other amplified phone, but feature a large, built-in screen that displays captions of everything the other caller says. You simply read along while you're having the conversation, with free captioning service available.
  • Clocks and timers. Standard alarm clocks are not very effective at waking deep sleepers or people with a hearing loss, especially those who are severely hard of hearing or deaf. Assistive alarm clocks often include a combination of features, such as extra loud alarms, bed shakers, and lamp flashers, that are designed to help wake you up .
  • Personal amplifiers are devices which help you hear what other people are saying in one-on-one conversations or in small group settings. Most personal amplifiers come with earphones.
  • Signaling systems are notification devices designed to alert you of different events around the home, such as phone calls and smoke/carbon monoxide alarms. These devices use flashing lights, loud alarms and/or vibration alarms to alert users.
  • TV listening systems allow a user to listen to television without disturbing others. Volume can be adjusted independently from the actual TV and background noise is reduced to make listening easier.
Meet with a Henry Ford Audiologist
Take the next step.