PERC Research News

Study: Babies Born by C-section at Risk of Developing Allergies

February 24, 2013

christinecolejohnson

For expectant moms who may contemplate the pros and cons of natural child birth or Caesarian section, a Henry Ford Hospital study suggests that C-section babies are susceptible to developing allergies by age two.

Researchers found that babies born by C-section are five times more likely to develop allergies than babies born naturally when exposed to high levels of common allergens in the home such as those from dogs, cats and dust mites.

The study was presented Sunday at the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology annual meeting in San Antonio.

“This further advances the hygiene hypothesis that early childhood exposure to microorganisms affects the immune system’s development and onset of allergies,” says Christine Cole Johnson, Ph.D., MPH, chair of Henry Ford Department of Health Sciences and the study’s lead author. “We believe a baby’s exposure to bacteria in the birth canal is a major influencer on their immune system.”

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Race Linked to Childhood Food Allergies, Not Environmental Allergies

February 23, 2013

KimHaejim

Research conducted at Henry Ford Hospital shows that race and possibly genetics play a role in children’s sensitivity to developing allergies.

Researchers found:

  • African-American children were sensitized to at least one food allergen three times more often than Caucasian children.
  • African-American children with one allergic parent were sensitized to an environmental allergen twice as often as African-American children without an allergic parent.

The study was presented Saturday at the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology annual meeting in San Antonio

“Our findings suggest that African Americans may have a gene making them more susceptible to food allergen sensitization or the sensitization is just more prevalent in African American children than white children at age 2,” says Haejim Kim, M.D., a Henry Ford allergist and the study’s lead author. “More research is needed to further look at the development of allergy.”

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Steroid Injection Linked to Increased Risk of Bone Fractures

Oct. 25, 2012

Mandel Shlomo 10C

Patients treated with an epidural steroid injection for back pain relief are at increased risk of bone fractures in the spine, according to a Henry Ford Hospital study.

Researchers say the risk of fracture increased 29 percent with each steroid injection, a finding they believe raises patient safety concerns.

“For a patient population already at risk for bone fractures, steroid injections carry a greater risk that previously thought and actually pose a hazard to the bone,” says Shlomo Mandel, M.D., a Henry Ford orthopedic physician and the study’s lead author.

The study was accepted as a Best Paper to be presented Thursday, Oct. 25 at the annual meeting of the North American Spine Society in Dallas.

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Study: Optimal Treatment Duration for MRSA-related Pneumonia

Oct. 19, 2012

Zainah Hadeel 08C

The national practice guideline for treating MRSA-related pneumonia is seven to 21 days. A Henry Ford Hospital study found that effective treatment can be done in half the time.

Researchers found that 40 percent of patients were treated for eight to 13 days on a therapy of the antibiotics vancomycin or linezolid, and had the highest survival rate.

The Henry Ford study is believed to be the first to evaluate the length of treatment for MRSA-related pneumonia.

The study was presented Friday at the annual Infectious Diseases Society of America meeting in San Diego.

“Based on our study, clinicians can effectively treat their patients within eight to 13 days, thus minimizing patients’ exposure to antibiotics and their side effects,” says Hadeel Zainah, M.D., a second-year Infectious Diseases fellow at Henry Ford and the study’s lead author.

Using Human Stool to Treat C-Diff is Safe, Effective

Oct. 19, 2012

Ramesh Mayur 09C

A novel therapy that uses donated human stool to treat the deadly and contagious C.diff infection is safe and highly effective, according to a Henry Ford Hospital study.

Researchers found that 43 of 49 patients recovered swiftly after treatment and had no adverse complications from C.diff three months later. Treatment is performed either through a nasogastric tube or colonoscopy on an outpatient or inpatient basis.

Mayur Ramesh, M.D., a Henry Ford Infectious Diseases physician and senior author of the study, says the treatment, while appearing unconventional, has striking results.

“More than 90 percent of the patients in our study were cured of their C.diff infection,” says Dr. Ramesh. “This treatment is a viable option for patients who are not responding to conventional treatment and who want to avoid surgery.”

The study was presented Friday at the annual Infectious Diseases Society of America meeting in San Diego.

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Study: Colorectal Cancer Screening Saves Lives

May 21, 2012

christinecolejohnson

Colorectal cancer screening saves lives. That’s the finding of the largest cancer screening study ever conducted in the United States.

The study involving nearly 155,000 patients found that screening with flexible sigmoidoscopy reduced by 50 percent mortality and by 29 percent new cases of colorectal cancer found in the section of the colon examined.

Results of the study, called the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Screening Trial, will be published online Monday in the New England Journal of Medicine.

The findings represent the most definitive answer to date about the effectiveness of colon cancer screening, says Christine Cole Johnson, Ph.D., a study co-author and chair of Public Health Sciences at Henry Ford Health System, one of 10 study participating sites and the only site in Michigan.

Researchers Say Urine Dipstick Test is Accurate Predictor of Renal Failure in Sepsis Patients

May 10, 2012

Neyra Lozano Javier 09C

Henry Ford Hospital researchers have found that the presence of excess protein in a common urine test is an effective prognostic marker of acute renal failure in patients with severe sepsis.

Researchers analyzed data from 328 sepsis patients with no previous history of protein in the urine and found the urine dipstick test predicted the presence of renal failure in 55 percent of these patients.

A urine dipstick test is routinely done as part of a urinalysis to help diagnose urinary tract infections, kidney disease, diabetes and sepsis, the deadly bloodstream infection. After a urine sample is taken, a specially treated chemical strip is placed into the sample. Patches on the dipstick will change color to indicate the presence of such things as white blood cells, protein, or glucose.

Many studies have shown the dipstick test to be a rapid detector for identifying urinary tract infections. Henry Ford researchers evaluated for the first time the dipstick test for its accuracy of identifying renal failure in sepsis patients.

Study: More Accurate Method Required for Tracking Skin Cancer Cases

April 5, 2012

EideMelody08C

Henry Ford Hospital dermatology researchers are urging caution about using claims data for identifying nonmelanoma skin cancer, suggesting that the commonly used method, which previously had not been validated, may be unreliable. Instead, researchers say, an electronic pathology report (EPR) is far superior for more accurately identifying cases. Claims data is common health insurance billing information. EPR shows the biopsy of a skin specimen result.

In a study published online Thursday in the Society for Investigative Dermatology, lead author and Henry Ford dermatologist Melody Eide, M.D., says "claims data may incorrectly estimate actual disease burden, with up to half of cases found to be false."

Combined Therapy of Acne Medications Offers New Treatment Option for Patients

March 14, 2012

Stein Gold Linda 08C

A combined therapy of common acne medications was shown to be a potent regimen for treating patients with severe facial acne, according to two published studies involving Henry Ford Hospital. The companion studies found that a therapy of the topical Epiduo? Gel containing adapalene and benzoyl peroxide and the antibiotic doxycycline proved more effective at reducing acne lesions compared to other treatment regimens.

Findings from the studies are published in the February issues of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology and Journal of Dermatological Treatment. Henry Ford was one of 34 participating sites in the United States and Canada, and the only hospital in Michigan.

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