Innovation and Clinical Trials for Structural Heart Disease

Clinical trials test the use and effectiveness of new devices and treatment techniques, after careful consideration of their likely safety. If you’re eligible, choosing to participate in a clinical trial can help advance care for the public and also give you early access to promising treatments.

Our program has a long history with these efforts, leading clinical trials and joining many others. In fact, when you come to us for care, you’ll find trials available only at select programs. Our innovations lead to significant progress treating structural heart disease, and we offer options aimed at longer and healthier life.

Talk to your doctor to see if a clinical trial is right for you.

Our innovations for structural heart disease

Clinical studies at Henry Ford Health System have helped create new devices and techniques for treating structural heart diseases. Some of our research accomplishments include:

  • Testing devices to reduce stroke risk: For people with atrial fibrillation, special devices can close the heart’s left atrial appendage (LAA). We helped secure approval for these devices, which prevent blood clots from leaving the heart and causing strokes.
  • Developing the BASILICA procedure: Henry Ford doctors participated in clinical research to develop the BASILICA procedure. This minimally invasive technique helps make transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) safer.

Our current research efforts

Many of our recent and current clinical trials focus on developing additional minimally invasive techniques for heart valve repair and replacement:

  • Tendyne valve: This replacement valve corrects mitral valve regurgitation and is the only device of its kind doctors can reposition and retrieve, if necessary.
  • SAPIEN M3 valve: This replacement valve corrects severe mitral valve regurgitation in people who can’t have surgery.
  • CLASP study: This study involves the Edwards PASCAL Transcatheter Mitral Valve Repair System. The system is designed to treat leaking mitral valves.

How clinical trials work

Clinical trials generally progress through four phases. Each phase evaluates different aspects of a new medication or procedure:

  • Phase I: Researchers investigate new treatments to determine how they should be given/performed and how long they will last, as well as to further evaluate their safety.
  • Phase II: Researchers begin to evaluate how well a new treatment works.
  • Phase III: During this phase, doctors compare the new treatment to current, standard treatments for a specific condition. In many cases, Phase III clinical trials enroll large numbers of people.
  • Phase IV: The last phase of a clinical trial occurs after the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves the new medication or procedure. Investigators monitor the safety of the new treatment for its long-term effects in large population groups.

How can you participate in research studies for structural heart disease?

To learn more about research studies currently underway at Henry Ford, call (313) 916-1784. You may also search for a clinical trial for structural heart disease.

Take the next step.

Let us help you schedule an appointment.

Schedule Appointment Online

If this is an emergency, call 911 or go to your nearest emergency department.

For your safety, please select a MyChart video visit on demand or call our MyCare Advice Line at 844-262-1949 before scheduling if:

  • You currently have a temperature greater than 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit
  • In the past 21 days, you have been diagnosed with COVID-19
  • In the past 14 days, you have had contact with anyone diagnosed with COVID-19
  • You are experiencing a new loss of taste and/or sense of smell
  • If you have experienced two or more of the following symptoms in the last 3 days:
    • fever
    • chills
    • drenching sweats
    • new cough
    • shortness of breath
    • body aches
    • headache
    • sore throat
    • runny nose or nasal congestion
    • nausea/vomiting/diarrhea

Henry Ford Health System is committed to ensuring our Deaf or hard-of-hearing patients and visitors have equal access to all services. We provide the appropriate auxiliary aids and services, including qualified sign language interpreters, TTYs and other assistive listening devices, at no cost. To request assistance, call 313-916-1896 or email CommunicationAccess@hfhs.org.

Schedule Appointment for